26 October 2016

WRITING INFORMAL LETTERS/EMAILS

Writing informal letters and emails involves writing letters or emails to friends or relatives.
When writing an informal letter or email our language is more relaxed and we are able to use abbreviations, which is rare in other forms of English writing, except perhaps when using direct speech.
English expressions-Informal emails/letters
Examples of informal letters/emails
And click here to do a multiple choice exercise.
NOW IT'S YOUR TURN:
EXERCISE 1:

You have received the following letter from your English penfriend:
I'm really pleased you're planning to come to England to study. Let me know what type of course you're interested in and I'll ring some colleges for details. The more information you can give me the better!

Write your letter of reply to your penfriend (around190 words).
EXERCISE 2:
You have received the following email from your English penfriend:
It's a really brave step to take a year out of college to come and spend 6 months in the UK! What are you planning to do with your time? Find a job? Learn some new skills? Write back and give me more details of your plans so I can do my best to help you have a good time...
Write your letter of reply to your penfriend (around 190 words).

HALLOWEEN HISTORY

Halloween isn't just costumes and candy; it's a cultural holiday rich in tradition. Watch the video and do the activity. To check your answers CLICK HERE

  1. Halloween is described as a patchwork holiday stitched together with ________    ________ and ________ traditions. 
  2. It all began with the ________, a people whose culture had spread across Europe more than ________ _______ ________.  
  3. The end of the ________ _________ was celebrated in a festival called Samhain
  4. On Samhain  the villagers gathered and ________  ________  ________ to drive the dead back and keep them  away  from   the  _______.  
  5. All Saints’ Day honours ________ and  the _________ _______.
  6. ________ ________ was known as “All Hallows’ Eve”.
  7. The holiday came to America with the wave of Irish immigrants during the ________ ________ in the _______.
  8. The children _______ _______ so they _______ ________ _______. 
  9. Over the years the harmless tricks grew into outright _______.
  10. Shopkeepers began to give treats or bribes to stop the ________ .  
  11. By the _______ _______ “Trick or Treat” became the holiday greeting.
DO YOU PREFER A READING?   CLICK HERE

24 October 2016

HAPPINESS (THAT'S ENGLISH! MOD 11. UNIT 1)

What is happiness for you?
Is happiness a goal for you?
What makes you feel happy?
Are you happy most of the time?
What makes you unhappy?
When was the happiest time of your childhood? And of your life?
Can you be happy if you are rich/poor?
Do you agree that older people are less happy?
Are the people in your country generally very happy?
Do you think some nations are happier than others?

Interaction : How important are these factors to achieve happiness? Discuss them and choose the three most important ones for you. Then try to agree with your partner(s) on a common list. 
excellent health and fitness
an interesting and worthwhile job
material wealth and a high standard of living
being good-looking and having a great figure
being content spiritually
a wide circle of supportive friends and family
achieving promotion and/or respect at work

To illustrate the point you can watch the video And the secret of happiness is...
Thanks to mythatsenglish.blogspot.com

19 October 2016

BIG FAMILY VERSUS SMALL FAMILY

EXPRESSIONS WITH GET

TO GET can be used in a number of patterns and has a number of meanings.
TO GET + DIRECT OBJECT = TO OBTAIN, TO RECEIVE, TO BUY
  • got my passport last week. (to obtain)
  • She got her driving license last week. (to obtain)
  • They got permission to live in Switzerland. (to obtain)
  • got a letter from my friend in Nigeria. (to receive)
  • He gets $1,000 a year from his father. (to receive)
  • She got a new coat from Zappaloni in Rome. (to buy)
  • We got a new television for the sitting room. (to buy)
TO GET + PLACE EXPRESSION = REACH, ARRIVE AT A PLACE
  • How are you getting home tonight?
  • We got to London around 6 p.m.
  • What time will we get there?
  • When did you get back from New York?
TO GET + ADJECTIVE = BECOME, SHOW A CHANGE OF STATE
  • I am getting old.
  • It's getting hotter.
  • By the time they reached the house they were getting hungry.
  • I'm getting tired of all this nonsense.
  • My mother's getting old and needs looking after.
  • It gets dark very early in the winter.
  • Don't touch the stove until is gets cool.
TO GET + PREPOSITION/ADVERB 



to get attry to express
I think I see what you're getting at. I agree.

to get away withescape punishment
I can't believe you got away with cheating on that test!

to get bymanage (financially)
Sam doesn't earn much, but we get by.

to get downdepress, descend
This rain is really getting me down.

to get offleave a form of transport (train, bus, bicycle, plane)
We got off the train just before the bomb exploded.

to get on1. enter/sit on a form of transport (train, bus, bicycle, plane)
2. have a relationship with someone
1. He got on his bicycle and rode down the street.
2. Amy and I really get on well.

to get on withto proceed
I have so much homework, I'd better get on with it.

to get out ofavoid doing something, especially a duty
She got out of the washing-up every day, even when it was her turn.

to get overrecover (from an illness, a surprise)
Have you gotten over your cold yet?
to get throughuse or finish the supply of something
We've got through all the sugar. Can you buy some more?

to get upleave your bed
He gets up at 6.00 a.m. every morning.



  • Do you get it means do you understand.
    Do you get what the teacher was explaining in class?
  • He's getting dinner tonight means he's preparing the meal.
    You can relax. It's my turn to get dinner tonight.
  • I'll get the bill means I'll pay.
    Put your wallet away! I'll get the bill.
  • That really gets me! means that irritates me.
    It really gets me when my sister shows up late.
  • To get rid of something means to throw it away.
    I'm going to get rid of all these old newspapers.
  • To get out of bed on the wrong side means to be in a bad mood.
    He got out of the wrong side of the bed this morning and he's been horrible all day.
  • To get your own back means to have your revenge or punish someone.
    She's getting her own back for all those rude things you said at the party last night.

EXERCISE ON PHRASAL VERBS: CLICK HERE

AUXILIARY VERBS

17 October 2016

Bob Dylan Awarded Nobel Prize in Literature

Bob Dylan, regarded as the voice of a generation for his influential songs from the 1960s onwards, has won the Nobel Prize for Literature. Bob Dylan was named the surprise winner of the Nobel prize for literature in Stockholm today “for having created new poetic expressions within the great American song tradition”.