27 April 2015

Ruth Chang: How to make hard choices

Here's a talk that could literally change your life. Which career should I pursue? Should I break up — or get married?! Where should I live? Big decisions like these can be agonizingly difficult. But that's because we think about them the wrong way, says philosopher Ruth Chang. She offers a powerful new framework for shaping who we truly are.

MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

23 April 2015

St George's Day: As Google Doodle marks England's patron saint, here are some facts that may surprise you

With his trusty white steed and dense suit of armour, St George is - along with tea and rain - one the most recognisable symbols of England. 
And to mark St George’s Day, Google has featured an illustrated Doodle of England's patron saint battling a dragon on its homepage.
Here are some facts about the Patron Saint of England that might surprise you...
Saint George isn’t English
While St George’s exact birthdate remains unclear but is likely to be 270 AD, we know that he was born in Cappadocia, part of modern day Turkey.  

20 April 2015

HEADLINESE

Syntax

Because space is limited, headlines are written in a compressed telegraphic style, using special syntactic conventions:
  • Forms of the verb "to be" are omitted.
  • Articles are usually omitted.
  • Most verbs are in the simple present tense, e.g. "Governor signs bill".
  • The future is expressed as "to" followed by a verb, e.g. "Governor to sign bill".
  • In the US (but not the UK), conjunctions are often replaced by a comma, as in "Bush, Blair laugh off microphone mishap".
  • To save space, a long word is sometimes replaced by a shorter word with not quite the same meaning, e.g. "attack" to mean "criticize".
  • Country names are often used instead of their adjective form, for example "Belgium troops deploy to patrol streets" (instead of "Belgian troops...").
Headlines are generally sentences or noun phrases.     READ MORE...